Cleansers + Masks

Tested on three different skin tones + types, ingredient-approved.

 
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The idea of cleansing dates back to the origin of the human race.

In earliest times, cleansing the skin was done by using a piece of bone or stone to scrape debris from the skin’s surface. Later on, civilizations would soon evolve by using materials of plant origin, along with water. The discovery of soap, however, can be credited to various human civilizations. The earliest mention of soap-making was found in Sumerian clay tablets of 2000 BC. By 600 BC, tree ash and animal fat had been used by the Phoenicians to prepare soap. Roman legend says that soap was discovered near Mount Sapo, a site of burnt animal sacrifices located outside Rome. The importance of soap as a cleansing agent, however, was recognized only after the first century. The Greek physician Galen (130–200 AD) and the eighth century chemist Gabiribne Hayyan were the first to have written about the use of soap as a body-cleansing agent. The details of saponification—the process of soap making was published in 1775.[3] The English have been credited with developing the first wrapped soap bar in 1884. The soap market continued to expand and during the Second World war (1948), the development of synthetic detergents came as a major breakthrough.[1] Synthetic detergents now form the basis of many present day skin-cleansing products.

Why Do we need cleansers?

Many of the environmental impurities and cosmetic products are not water soluble and so washing the skin with simple water would not be sufficient to remove them. Substances capable of emulsifying them into finer particles are to be used for making these fat soluble impurities water soluble. Herein, cleansers fit into the picture. Skin cleansers are surface—active substances (i.e. emulsifiers/detergents/surfactants/soaps) that lower the surface tension on the skin and remove dirt, sebum, oil from cosmetic products, microorganisms, and exfoliated corneum cells in an emulsified form. An ideal cleanser should do all these without damaging or irritating the skin, on the contrary it should try to keep the skin surface moist.[4]

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MASKS

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CLEANSERS

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